Librarian Wanderer

Librarian, educator, and traveller at heart, making my way through New York City.

tubooks:

Dwayne McDuffie on the realities of the Black writer in the comic book industry

"It makes the readership uncomfortable because they’re not used to seeing it."

Key takeaway—they’re not used to seeing it, and it makes them uncomfortable. The “Rule of Three”—that three black characters makes it a “black story”—is a very common assumption in white audiences, the idea that it’s “not for me” anymore. We think the more mainstream audiences see diversity everywhere, the more they’ll embrace it. But we (they) have to get past any assumptions of agendas and focus on how awesome the story is. It’s a challenge sometimes.

Would it be fair to call having a female protagonist the “Rule of One” making that book a girl story? I have encountered both sets of rationale too regularly (depending on my library audience) and I don’t think I yet have an effective set of tools to combat these fallacies. What are some good methods to open up a dialogue to dismantle these assumptions?

thepinakes:

The “tier one" LIS journals ranked by Journal Openness Factor as developed by Micah Vandegrift and (tumblarian) Chealsye Bowley in their article “Heal Thyself: A Scholarly Communication Analysis of LIS Journals.”
Eight of the ten most prestigious library and information science journals are not open access. That’s embarrassing.
From the article:

Based on this, in closing, we submit these final questions to the LIS research community: are these the journals we want on a top tier list, and what measure of openness will we define as acceptable for our prestigious journals? Further, how long will we tolerate measurements like impact factor and h-index guiding our criteria for advancement, while accounting for very little that matters to how we principle ourselves and our work? Finally, has the time come and gone for LIS to lead the shifts in scholarly communication? It is our hope that this article prompts furious and fair debate, but mostly that it produces real, substantive evolution within our profession, how we research, how we assign value to scholarship, and how we share the products of our intellectual work.

Heal Thyself: A Scholarly Communication Analysis of LIS Journals | In the Library with the Lead Pipe

Yes, that’s embarrassing if we’re supposed to be carrying the banner for academic openness.

thepinakes:

The “tier one" LIS journals ranked by Journal Openness Factor as developed by Micah Vandegrift and (tumblarian) Chealsye Bowley in their article “Heal Thyself: A Scholarly Communication Analysis of LIS Journals.”

Eight of the ten most prestigious library and information science journals are not open access. That’s embarrassing.

From the article:

Based on this, in closing, we submit these final questions to the LIS research community: are these the journals we want on a top tier list, and what measure of openness will we define as acceptable for our prestigious journals? Further, how long will we tolerate measurements like impact factor and h-index guiding our criteria for advancement, while accounting for very little that matters to how we principle ourselves and our work? Finally, has the time come and gone for LIS to lead the shifts in scholarly communication? It is our hope that this article prompts furious and fair debate, but mostly that it produces real, substantive evolution within our profession, how we research, how we assign value to scholarship, and how we share the products of our intellectual work.

Heal Thyself: A Scholarly Communication Analysis of LIS Journals | In the Library with the Lead Pipe

Yes, that’s embarrassing if we’re supposed to be carrying the banner for academic openness.

(via thelifeguardlibrarian)

ARL Joins Amicus Brief in Garcia v. Google Copyright Case

arlpolicynotes:

On Friday, April 11, 2014, the Association of Research Libraries (ARL), along with the American Library Association, Association of College and Research Libraries, and other organizations, joined an amicus brief authored by the Electronic Frontier Foundation in Garcia v. Google. The brief urges the US Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit to reconsider its decision in this copyright case in which a 2-1 panel ruled in favor of Cindy Lee Garcia, one of the actors in the film Innocence of Muslims. Garcia claimed a copyright interest in her performance after being tricked into appearing in a five-second clip of the film and subsequently sought takedown of the film from YouTube, which is owned by Google.

The decision by the three-judge panel raises serious concerns as it alters the traditional contours of copyright and impacts the future of online free speech. The brief urges the Ninth Circuit to rehear this case en banc, so that the full court may reconsider these important issues.

mikerugnetta:

After going to XOXO last year I had a semi-serious idea to organize bi-monthly hang outs at a bar in Brooklyn because many people at the conference seemed to share in roughly the same anxiety: “How is it that I–a person who has no idea what they’re doing and is not qualified to do it–have gotten myself into this position?” 
At XOXO there was lots of talk about the Impostor Syndrome. Inside my brain there is lots of thinking about how I am an impostor. Margaret Atwood maybe also thinks (or at one point thought) she’s an impostor. And so I thought well whatever maybe we should all hang out and drink and be impostors together? 

I, for one, love this idea. Partly to meet Mike because I would love to pick his brain (what does he think about the intersection of internet and libraries), and partly because it is a fantastic idea to make space safe to be vulnerable about these questions. 

So Mike, please do this!

mikerugnetta:

After going to XOXO last year I had a semi-serious idea to organize bi-monthly hang outs at a bar in Brooklyn because many people at the conference seemed to share in roughly the same anxiety: “How is it that I–a person who has no idea what they’re doing and is not qualified to do it–have gotten myself into this position?” 

At XOXO there was lots of talk about the Impostor Syndrome. Inside my brain there is lots of thinking about how I am an impostor. Margaret Atwood maybe also thinks (or at one point thought) she’s an impostor. And so I thought well whatever maybe we should all hang out and drink and be impostors together? 

I, for one, love this idea. Partly to meet Mike because I would love to pick his brain (what does he think about the intersection of internet and libraries), and partly because it is a fantastic idea to make space safe to be vulnerable about these questions. 

So Mike, please do this!

gayleforman:

Remember when I said I was going to post the #IfIStayMovieTrailer tomorrow morning?
Well, actually I`m going to post it RIGHT NOW!

Hope you`re ready for ALL.THE.FEELS.

Thanks, MTV!!

I totally need to reread this. Just haven’t been sure I can handle all those feels. Again.

humansofnewyork:

"I’m studying to be a librarian."
"What’s the sexiest part about being a librarian?"
"I’d say the width of our knowledge. The rest of academia seems to have a rather specific focal point, whereas librarians need to know enough to serve as a guide for researchers of every discipline."

Ah-yep. Similarly, it’s what make school librarians the coolest teachers in the school (in my oh-so-humble opinion): we get to teach the broadest set of tools to our students so they are best equipped to always ask their own questions and seek their own answers.

humansofnewyork:

"I’m studying to be a librarian."

"What’s the sexiest part about being a librarian?"

"I’d say the width of our knowledge. The rest of academia seems to have a rather specific focal point, whereas librarians need to know enough to serve as a guide for researchers of every discipline."

Ah-yep. Similarly, it’s what make school librarians the coolest teachers in the school (in my oh-so-humble opinion): we get to teach the broadest set of tools to our students so they are best equipped to always ask their own questions and seek their own answers.

pickeringtonlibrary:

bookish:

The First ‘Gone Girl’ Trailer Will Leave You Chilled
// 

So…anyone else thoroughly creeped out now?

I hated this book so much. Reading it made me so disgusted. And for that reason, it is the perfect film. And this is a great start to its trailers.

pickeringtonlibrary:

bookish:

The First ‘Gone Girl’ Trailer Will Leave You Chilled

So…anyone else thoroughly creeped out now?

I hated this book so much. Reading it made me so disgusted. And for that reason, it is the perfect film. And this is a great start to its trailers.

randomhouse:

outofprintclothing:

"Spotted this morning at Earls Court tube station #lbf14” 
(h/t @LitBritish)

Encouraging commuter reading! We approve. 

This morning, if I had seen this, I may have cried. It was one of those days.
#sick

randomhouse:

outofprintclothing:

"Spotted this morning at Earls Court tube station #lbf14” 

(h/t @LitBritish)

Encouraging commuter reading! We approve. 

This morning, if I had seen this, I may have cried. It was one of those days.

#sick