"Of course, each series is made up of individual books, and there are variations within a series as well. Applying the same methodology to just the Hunger Games trilogy, I isolated the most distinctive adjectives for each of the three books. What I found was a transition from “weak,” “wild,” and “furious” in The Hunger Games (in which Katniss must endure the Hunger Games competition) to “mental,” “physical,” and “ridiculous” in Catching Fire (in which Katniss must handle both a second competition and a rebellion) to “glad,” “lucky,” and “funny” in Mockingjay (in which Katniss struggles through a series of unfortunate events but ultimately finds a measure of peace)."
- Ben Blatt, “A Textual Analysis of The Hunger Games”

This. Is. Amazing. Check out the article for more charts comparing these series. And if the absurdist Waiting for Voldemort play doesn’t open off Broadway next year, I don’t know what I’ll do.

"Of course, each series is made up of individual books, and there are variations within a series as well. Applying the same methodology to just the Hunger Games trilogy, I isolated the most distinctive adjectives for each of the three books. What I found was a transition from “weak,” “wild,” and “furious” in The Hunger Games (in which Katniss must endure the Hunger Games competition) to “mental,” “physical,” and “ridiculous” in Catching Fire (in which Katniss must handle both a second competition and a rebellion) to “glad,” “lucky,” and “funny” in Mockingjay (in which Katniss struggles through a series of unfortunate events but ultimately finds a measure of peace)."

- Ben Blatt, “A Textual Analysis of The Hunger Games

This. Is. Amazing. Check out the article for more charts comparing these series. And if the absurdist Waiting for Voldemort play doesn’t open off Broadway next year, I don’t know what I’ll do.